this is where i might start gushing

cosmic thing

I think at one point, I was going to post this photo in relation to Deleuze’s articulation of time, via Leibniz (to some degree); the way in which he discusses the syntheses of time in the Cinema books; as well as the excellent cartoon of the converging narratives at the site of the ‘event’ in the Three Novellas in D & G’s ATP. At the time I was reading Difference and Repetition and was equally captured by his articulation of the third synthesis as potential, the virtual contained within the current state, regardless of its visible characteristic.

But now, having finally (FINALLY) finished D & R, I feel uncertain how Deleuze truly feels about Leibniz’s conception of the event/time. It seemed that he was not quite, but almost, dismissing the account of convergence upon one event, as it seemed to locate all focus upon the one element, which has the effect of effacing the pure difference that Deleuze is trying to hold onto. I think ultimately, for myself, focusing on the event directs the lines to one location still seems helpful, but within that recognition of the singular site/event, it is important to remember that it is but one point among countless others; and within the event, each person has their own horizon/positionality (ideological, physical, emotional) that they bring to bear on that understanding. I guess it still is reduced to representation, but it still seems like a fruitful way of conceptualizing an exterior event in relation to ourselves and our place in the world.

Of course, ultimately, I do not recall, what, precisely, made me thinking of Damian Ortega’s Cosmic Thing in relation to Deleuze. What I do know, I was entirely captivated by something D had written, which made me think of this piece. I could likely retrace the connections, but I think I’ll just throw this unfinished thought out into the world and keep moving.

Advertisements

Taking time to dwell with Iain Sinclair

vacancy, psychogeography, solitary walks… what’s not to like here?

ANTHEM

Iain Sinclair is a leading writer, filmmaker, poet and psychogeographer, renowned for his walks in the borderlands of cities, derelict sites and urban redevelopments. His solitary walks in Middlesbrough and Hartlepool were the focus of a public talk at mima. Sinclair previously walked the M25 to write London Orbital, and his new book, Ghost Milk, is a road map of post-Olympics landscapes.

View original post

Milan, then Lisbon

There is something to be said for having to submit a paper well in advance of the conference. Namely, that I won’t be working on it the night before… As part of the summer fun, I’ll be heading to the New Urban Languages Conference in Milan in June to present on Google (paper here), then heading up to Lisbon to present on Deleuze, Spinoza, and oh, glorious wonder.